R gist — VOT and place of articulation

knitr::opts_chunk$set(echo = TRUE, message = FALSE, warning = FALSE) knitr::opts_knit$set(root.dir = here::here()) library(tidyverse) library(plotly) Read data vot <- read_csv("./static/data/chodroff2019/ChodroffGoldenWilson2019_vot_avg.csv") %>% group_by(vot.category) %>% mutate(vot.mu_z = scale(vot.mu)) %>% ungroup() %>% pivot_wider(names_from = poa.broad, values_from = c(vot.mu, vot.mu_z)) %>% mutate(vot_category = recode(vot.category, long.lag = "long lag", short.lag = "short lag")) Mean VOT vot %>% plot_ly( x = ~vot.mu_labial, y = ~vot.mu_coronal, z = ~vot.mu_dorsal, color = ~vot_category, text = ~language, marker = list(size = 5, opacity = 0....

April 22, 2021 · 1 min · Stefano Coretta

An estimate of number of speakers per study in phonetics

A few weeks ago, I’ve asked on Twitter what people thought was the average number of participants used in phonetic studies. Here’s the tweet. Does anyone have an estimate of the average number of participants/tokens per context of recently published phonetic studies (let's say from the last 10 years)? #OpenScience #phonetics #replication — Stefano Coretta (@StefanoCoretta) April 12, 2019 Thankfully, Timo Roettger has pointed me to a dataset he and Matthew Gordon created for a study on the acoustic correlates of word stress, and he suggested to look at how the median number of speakers changed (or not) through the years....

May 3, 2019 · 3 min · Stefano Coretta
Literate Praat scripting

Literate programming with Praat

This post quickly illustrates how to apply a literate programming workflow to Praat scripting. To be able to reproduce the steps described here you need the latest version of pandoc and the Literate Markdown Tangler (lmt, you will need to install Go first to install lmt). What is literate programming? In literate programming, one writes both code and plain text which explains what the code does in a single document....

March 21, 2019 · 4 min · Stefano Coretta

On the phonotactic restrictions of Proto-Indoeuropean roots

Proto-Indoeuropean lexicon is based on monosyllabic roots which have an alternating (ablaut) root vowel preceded and followed by consonants. In this post, I will share some thoughts on the phonotactic restrictions which seem to dictate which consonants can cooccur in a root. I will focus here on stops and laryngeal features. Although I have some formal training in Indoeuropean linguistics, what follows is more of an academic game, so I invite the reader not to expect a fully developed argument....

January 6, 2019 · 4 min · Stefano Coretta

Plotting tongue contours with ggplot2

When plotting tongue contours data obtained from ultrasound tongue imaging in R using ggplot2, a common option to smooth over the individual contours and show the general pattern is to use geom_smooth(methood = "loess"). However, as I will show in this post, in certain cases this method leads to very disorted contours. Such distortion is more or less always present, although at a lower degree in less extreme cases....

August 23, 2018 · 6 min · Stefano Coretta

Vowel formants trajectories and tidy data

With the advent of more powerful statistical methods for assessing time series data, it is now becoming more common to compare whole vowel formant trajectories rather then just using average values. In this post I will show how to tidy a formant measurements dataset and plot formants using the tidyverse (Wickham 2017). From wide to long To illustrate the process, I will use formant data that was kindly provided by Stephen Nichols....

March 2, 2018 · 5 min · Stefano Coretta

Short review of phonological databases

A review of available phonological databases (2014)....

June 30, 2014 · 2 min · Stefano Coretta